Developing Your Child's Self-Esteem

Updated: Jun 14


Everything in life is better when your self-esteem is high. Good things seem even better. Bad things are easier to tolerate and manage. The same is true for your child. A child with high self-esteem will do better in school, be more likely to avoid unhealthy behaviors, and be happier in general. Low self-esteem is a burden regardless of age.

Help your child develop their self-esteem:

  • Create opportunities for your child to be successful. Give your child a meaningful task to do that you know will result in success. Success breeds confidence and additional success. Give your child regular opportunities to experience success.

  • Monitor your children’s friends. Some friends are more kind than others. Try to steer your child toward other children that are kind and supportive. Find a way to limit time spent with those children that are less supportive.

  • Give your child some control. It’s easier to have self-esteem when you feel in control of your life. The easiest way to avoid a battle is to give your child choices, but you create the choices. “Do you want a banana, apple, or orange in your lunch today?” is a better question than, “What do you want to eat?”

  • Love your child unconditionally. It’s a mistake to make a child feel less loved because of misbehavior or a mistake. Deal with poor behavior, but avoid withholding your love.

  • Teach that failure isn’t a big deal as long as they do their best. It’s not something to get upset about or to avoid at all costs. It’s just a part of life. There’s always the opportunity to try again.

  • Give credible compliments. Your child knows if his drawing of a horse actually looks like a pig. But you can find plenty of legitimate reasons to give your child compliments.

  • Help your child to set goals and attain them together. The goal might be for your child to tie her own shoes or to get an A in algebra. Teach your child to work toward their goal each day.

  • Be confident. The more confident and comfortable you are in front of your child, the more secure they will feel. Your child is watching you for cues. If you’re obviously uncomfortable in certain situations, your child will be, too. Set a good example.

  • Address behavior, instead of your child. Saying that it’s wrong to lie is a better option than calling your child a liar. Avoid putting negative labels on your child.

  • Show love and affection regularly. Show your child that they are loved and appreciated every day.

It’s never too early to start boosting your child’s self-esteem. Providing a good foundation can prevent a lot of challenges in the teenage years. Act while your child is most impressionable. You can’t control every experience your child has, but you can control enough of them to make a huge difference.

Now, I'd love to hear from you. Where does your child's self-esteem seem to falter and how do you handle it?


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We'll look at their goals, challenges they are facing, opportunities they might be missing. We'll also uncover hidden problems that may be sabotaging their desired results. You'll leave the session feeling renewed, re-energized, and inspired to get results faster and easier then you thought possible. And you'll have a plan of action to do just that. "Action is the foundational key to all success." Picasso

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©2019 by Confident Kids Now. 

I'm Mary Kerwin

and I’ve been a teacher for over 40 years, as well as a mother to four children who pay their own bills. I understand the struggle of getting this parenting thing “right”. It’s hard to juggle all.the.things while making sure your children have everything they need to live happy, well-adjusted lives. 

 

I created this holistic curriculum because I saw a huge gap in what was being taught in school, and what kids actually need to make it in the real world. I believe it’s absolutely imperative for our kids to develop life skills because it will have a direct impact on their confidence and their future.